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ANDRES MOLANO


Associate Professor

Universidad de los Andes

a.molano [at] uniandes.edu.co

 

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ANDRES MOLANO


Associate Professor

Universidad de los Andes

a.molano [at] uniandes.edu.co

 

Academic Work

Andres Molano is an associate professor affiliated with the School of Education at Universidad de los Andes. His basic developmental work follows three primary lines of inquiry: (1) exploring the role of compositional and peer effects in school settings, (2) describing the interactions between school characteristics and environmental risk factors on the development of school and individual resilience, and (3) using quantitative analytic techniques to make stronger causal inferences about the direct and indirect paths that link social practices and policies with child and youth developmental outcomes.

Curriculum Vitae

Recent Published work

 


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Research Statement


My scholarship is situated at the intersection of applied developmental psychology, education and innovative statistical practices.  In my work, I explore the effect social relationships across settings on the development of children and adolescents, employing theories and methods from social and developmental psychology, sociology, economics, and statistics. I approach this work using ecological and developmental systems frameworks (Bronfenbrenner, 1979; 1998; Magnusson & Stattin, 1998; Sameroff, 1995; 2010) while paying special attention to the intertwined developmental processes of individuals and social settings (Tseng & Seidman, 2007; Jones & Molano, 2011). My work follows three primary lines of inquiry: (1) exploring the role of compositional and peer effects in school settings, (2) describing the interactions between school characteristics and environmental risk factors on the development of school and individual resilience, and (3) using analytic techniques drawn from other disciplines to make stronger causal inferences about the direct and indirect paths that link social practices and policies with child and youth developmental outcomes.

 

Research Statement


My scholarship is situated at the intersection of applied developmental psychology, education and innovative statistical practices.  In my work, I explore the effect social relationships across settings on the development of children and adolescents, employing theories and methods from social and developmental psychology, sociology, economics, and statistics. I approach this work using ecological and developmental systems frameworks (Bronfenbrenner, 1979; 1998; Magnusson & Stattin, 1998; Sameroff, 1995; 2010) while paying special attention to the intertwined developmental processes of individuals and social settings (Tseng & Seidman, 2007; Jones & Molano, 2011). My work follows three primary lines of inquiry: (1) exploring the role of compositional and peer effects in school settings, (2) describing the interactions between school characteristics and environmental risk factors on the development of school and individual resilience, and (3) using analytic techniques drawn from other disciplines to make stronger causal inferences about the direct and indirect paths that link social practices and policies with child and youth developmental outcomes.

 

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Teaching Statement


Questions of teaching, learning and development are at the core of my scholarship and practice. While my academic work focuses on the development of children and adolescents, most of my teaching practice has been developed with young adults in graduate and undergraduate programs. Setting aside obvious differences between these two contexts, a powerful idea for which I have benefited, and strived to disseminate through my teaching, is the importance of nurturing and caring social relationships for learning and development at many stages of the life course.

 

Teaching Statement


Questions of teaching, learning and development are at the core of my scholarship and practice. While my academic work focuses on the development of children and adolescents, most of my teaching practice has been developed with young adults in graduate and undergraduate programs. Setting aside obvious differences between these two contexts, a powerful idea for which I have benefited, and strived to disseminate through my teaching, is the importance of nurturing and caring social relationships for learning and development at many stages of the life course.

 

Courses - At Universidad de los Andes

 

EDUC – 4002. Human Development.

This graduate level seminar presents current debates in applied developmental science to students pursuing their advanced degrees in education and psychology. The seminar starts with the introduction of ecological and setting level frameworks as applied to human development, and builds from this framework to explore the interests of students around current issues in applied developmental work. In our work, we have explored diverse topics as those related to developmental transitions (i.e. pre-school to elementary, high-school to adult life), differences in students’ experience across school micro-contexts, and variability in learning experiences associated with changes in the hours and schedules of schooling. While exploring these issues, from the work and experience of students, an emphasis is placed in proximal processes as the fundamental engine behind human development.

 

EDUC-4007. Peace Education: Ecological approaches to human development, Spring 2014

This graduate seminar presents an ecological framework to understand processes social and emotional development of children and adolescents exposed to risky social environments. It focuses on rigorous evaluations of school-based interventions and allows students to assess the effectiveness of these practices, their most important challenges and their documented impact. Participating students produce, through the semester, a basic research, applied intervention or applied evaluation proposal that they could implement as partial fulfillment of their Master’s Degree on Education at Universidad de los Andes.

 

EDUC – 4902. Social Network Analysis and Human Development.

A graduate level seminar focusing on the role of diverse social networks on human development, as well as on the methodological tools that allows us to represent them and study them as central settings across development. In this seminar students explore how different behaviors, tastes and decision are influenced by closets peers, and how these effects become salient across educational settings. This seminar builds from a long-standing tradition in the social sciences that explores the role of peer relationships in development, and the methodological tools this body of scholarship has generated. While this is not a methodological seminar, students approach these analytical tools from their own personal and professional experience, while reflecting on the intricate processes involved in social selection and influence.

 

EDUC-4026. Quantitative Methods for Social Science and Educational Research, Fall 2014.

This course allows students on graduate programs from Psychology, Political Sciences and Education to become competent on the use of quantitative analytical techniques used in rigorous work in their disciplines. The course emphasizes the rationale, conditions and applications of linear and logistic regression techniques. Application, interpretation and communication are strongly emphasized. All examples, assignments and classroom activities use data collected from 9 Countries participating in the 2012 application of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). The course is supported by an applied laboratory conducted by a team of teaching fellows I supervise. 

 

EDUC - 6021. Methods and Designs Supporting Causal Inference in Social Sciences and Education.

A graduate level seminar that builds directly from Willet & Murnane’s world-renowned class and book “Methods Matter: Improving Causal Inference in Educational and Social Science Research”. In this advance seminar, students work and develop their own project to evaluate the causal effect of social and educational policies and intervention in child and youth development. The seminar introduces and addresses practical issues of innovative econometric techniques to evaluate the causal effect of these practices, while directly addressing the inverse relationship between researcher design and control of the setting with the methodological sophistication needed to causally identify average individual and setting level effects.

 

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academic work


academic work


Papers

 

working papers

academic presentations